The crucible abigail act 1 characterization

In fact, he deliberately provides little information about this character other than her age — seventeen — leaving the rest for the viewer or reader to decipher on the basis of her actions and descriptions In fact, he deliberately provides little information about this character other than her age — seventeen — leaving the rest for the viewer or reader to decipher on the basis of her actions and descriptions provided by other characters. Consequently, direct characterizations of Abigail, beyond her age, are provided by her detractors as the witch hunt she has precipitated begins to grow out of control.

The crucible abigail act 1 characterization

She bears most of the responsibility for the girls meeting with Tituba in the woods, and once Parris discovers them, she attempts to conceal her behavior because it will reveal her affair with Proctor if she confesses to casting a spell on Elizabeth Proctor.

Abigail lies to conceal her affair, and to prevent charges of witchcraft. In order to avoid severe punishment for casting spells and adultery — not to mention attempted murder when she plots Elizabeth's death — Abigail shifts the focus away from herself by accusing others of witchcraft.

This desperate act of self-preservation soon becomes Abigail's avenue of power. Abigail is the exact opposite of Elizabeth. Abigail represents the repressed desires — sexual and material — that all of the Puritans possess. The difference is that Abigail does not suppress her desires.

She finds herself attracted to Proctor while working in the Proctor home. According to the Puritanical mindset, Abigail's attraction to Proctor constitutes a sin, but one that she could repent of and refuse to acknowledge.

Abigail does the opposite. She pursues Proctor and eventually seduces him. Abigail's willingness to discard Puritan social restrictions sets her apart from the other characters, and also leads to her downfall. Abigail is independent, believing that nothing is impossible or beyond her grasp.

These admirable qualities often lead to creativity and a thirst for life; however, Abigail lacks a conscience to keep herself in check. As a result, she sees no folly in her affair with Proctor.

In fact, Abigail resents Elizabeth because she prevents Abigail from being with Proctor. Abigail gives new meaning to the phrase "all is fair in love and war.

The more she thinks about the affair, the more Abigail convinces herself that Proctor loves her but cannot express his love because of Elizabeth.

Abigail continues to review and edit her memories until they accurately portray her as the center of Proctor's existence. Rather than seeing herself as an awkward seventeen year-old who took advantage of a man's loneliness and insecurity during his wife's illness, Abigail sees herself as Proctor's true love and his ideal choice for a wife.

She believes she has only to eliminate Elizabeth so that she and Proctor can marry and fulfill her fantasy. Abigail's fantasy reflects her age. She is a young girl daydreaming about the ideal male. However, she possesses shrewd insight and a capacity for strategy that reveal maturity beyond that of most other characters.

Declaring witchcraft provides her with instant status and recognition within Salem, which translates into power. Abigail uses her authority to create an atmosphere of fear and intimidation. She threatens the other girls with violence if they refuse to go along with her plans, and she does not hesitate to accuse them of witchcraft if their loyalty proves untrue.

Such is the case with Mary Warren. Abigail develops a detailed plan to acquire Proctor and will stop at nothing to see her plan succeed. Her strategy includes establishing her credibility with the court and then eliminating Elizabeth. The achievement of her plot requires cold calculation, and so Abigail carefully selects the individuals that she accuses in order to increase her credibility.

Thus, she first accuses the town drunk and vagrant, knowing that society is already predisposed to convict them.Therefore, Miller builds up characterization by means of both action and dialogue.

The Proctors and Abigail Williams John Proctor is a farmer in his 40s in the Salem community. The Crucible- Abigail Act 1 Characterization assignment ; Post navigation.

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The crucible abigail act 1 characterization

Everything you ever wanted to know about Abigail Williams in The Crucible, written by masters of Tools of Characterization; MENU. Intro ; Summary ; Themes messed-up stuff.

The crucible abigail act 1 characterization

It's no surprise that a person exposed to such brutality at a young age might eventually act brutally herself. Abigail's ruthless, manipulative tactics might also be.

Another example of an indirect characterization of Abigail, albeit a considerably more kind one, involves her initial reaction to the entrance of her now-former lover John Proctor: MERCY: (Rising.

Get an answer for 'What are the direct and indirect characterizations of Abigail Williams in Miller's The Crucible?' and find homework help for other The Crucible .

This desperate act of self-preservation soon becomes Abigail's avenue of power. Abigail is the exact opposite of Elizabeth.

Abigail represents the repressed desires — sexual and material — that all of the Puritans possess. The difference is that Abigail does not suppress her desires.

SparkNotes: The Crucible: Character List